Travel Health - Keep On, Keeping On

Travel Health is important. Any journey can place great stress on your body and mind. You are subject to time changes, news places, problems, foods, and new microbes.

So slow down and pay attention to what your body's doing. Eat well and try and get plenty of sleep before you go if you can. Take your vitamins. Drink bottled water.

    Time to change the time on your watch to the destination's time is after you board your flight.
  • The first travel problem you face might be jet lag. The best way to deal with it is to mentally put yourself on your destination's time as soon as you take off.

    • Set your watch ahead.

    • Drink plenty of fluids on the flight since the dry air on your flight will dehydrate you.

    • Avoid alcohol since it also can dehydrate you.

    • Sleep as much on the flight as possible.

    • If you are prone to motion sickness or sea sickness than keep that air sick bag close by.

    • When you land, stay up to at least 8:00PM local time. This is important. It resets your internal clock.

    • Stay up by talking a walk in your new country/location. Get plenty of fresh air and sunshine.

    • Don't do anything dangerous like driving a car.

    • After 8:00PM, celebrate with a few drinks and go to bed.

    • Get up at a reasonable hour.

    • Again use physical activity to keep you up the second day till 8:00PM.

  • In Western Europe and most advanced places, food and water are safe. Check the Travel Health section in your guidebook.

  • You may need to be careful about food in Southern or Eastern Europe. Make sure it's served hot. Peal all fruit.

  • Bottled water is always best; make sure the seal is still on the bottle before drinking.

  • Find out from fellow travelers what they know on local travel health.

    Diarrhea - Struggling with the Monster
  • Remember, the food in Europe is different. Your body may misinterpret any meal as bad, and you become sick. Click on my page for Diarrhea - Struggling with the Monster for help.

  • Here is the Travel Health Website for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more information on Travel Health.

  • Bring a complete supply of all prescription drugs that you need for the whole trip, if you can. European pharmacies are well stocked. Most pharmacists there can dispense many drugs without a doctor prescription. So ask them.

  • Carry a note from your doctor with all prescription's names including generics.

  • Bring along an extra pair glasses or contact lenses, along with a copy of its prescription. Bring extra lens solution, if you have a particular brands you are used to.

  • Most non-prescription items are also easily available in most western countries. If you have a special brands you are used to, bring extra.

  • Travel insurance, if desired, is available through many companies. Check the numerous online sites or contact a local travel agent for more information.

  • International Student ID Card has basic coverage for accidents and illness.

  • Some credit cards provide some accident coverage if the airline ticket is purchased on it. Check credit card agreement.

  • AIDS is everywhere. Act responsibly. Contact your national or local health department for detailed information.

  • Outside Europe, check the International Association of Medical Assistance to Travellers (IAMAT), for information on health concerns in over 125 countries.


Always carry some toilet paper with you at all times, since in many countries the public toilets are not so supplied. McDonald's Restaurants do have the best bathrooms.



Here are some important road skills:

Go to page on Safety First

What to do about Lost Travelers

Motion Sickness and Sea Sickness

Diarrhea and Its Cures

Travel Money

The Euro

Travel Tips for Europe

Travel Phrases

Foreign Languages

Chinese Characters

Useful Travel Tools

Tourist Information

Electronic Travel Applications

Audio Tours for museums and cities

Travel Weather